In the Course of Human Events.

20180703_1416171

The three faces of Thomas Jefferson. 2004-2006. / Photo by KidZond.

Do me a favor.

Take out a piece of paper and a pen. Sign your name. Take a good look at it.

Now, I want you to be afraid of that signature of yours. I want you imagine that sometime in the very near future armed men are going to come to your house in the wee hours of the night to break down your door just because of that signature. They will drag you away, and bind your hands. Then, without a trial, without any recourse to defend yourself. They will put you on the end of a wooden cart pulled by a mule, place a rope around your neck and while a drummer rattles off a drumroll, move the cart and hang you till you are dead. Your signature just cost you your life. Also cost your family their freedom, their home, all of your property. Your friends will be harassed, maybe even arrested just because they knew you. Extended family member also. Just because you signed a nasty letter to the leader of your country.

We tend to forget history in the United States of America. It’s not one of our strong suits as Americans. Ask any high school kid which subject he or she finds the most boring, they will most likely tell you History.

I wasn’t that kid. I had the good fortune of having one Mr. Ronald Beam as my history teacher. A short stocky man, with red hair and freckles. Mr. Beam was a lover of history, he passed on that love to me and others. He made history funny, entertaining, and mostly, he made it come alive.

Maybe on purpose, or by his sheer comedic style in class, he let me imagine what it was like during important times in my nation’s history. He let me put on those historical figures proverbial shoes.

So, I think about my signature. And so should you.

We have all signed documents of importance. Buying a car, maybe buying a house, or maybe enlistment into the armed services. While important, not one of these documents would brand you a traitor. None of them would put you on a short list of individuals who must be caught and hung for the crime of treason.

Yet a group of men did just that. Put everything on the line for the stupidest of reasons. An Idea.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…” 

Of course, this isn’t true. If anything, all men (and women) are created unequal. Even back then, the idea that this line applied to women, native Americans, and black slaves, was untrue. Yet the Declaration of Independence, wasn’t just this document. It was a letter, addressed to the King of England. And that line was critically important.

King George III was the King of England at that time. He was also a very religious man. He was also rumored to believe in the ideology of Divine Rights of Kings. Even if that was not accepted in England anymore. Still, the Revolutionaries knew how to push buttons, and by calling for all men to be equal at birth, was a jab. And a good one. The King, they contended, was no better than them.

We miss that in our study of history, and the importance of the document. It was a letter, to a far off King who was above reproach. A King that believed in absolute loyalty to The Crown, and not disobedience of a bunch of Colonials.

We The People…

If you look at the first 10 Amendment of the United States Constitution, you will find what is called the Bill of Rights. Each of these 10 amendments are reactions to Colonial rule. They are guaranteed rights to freedoms that were taken from us under English rule. From the right to complain about how the government is run, to the right of a fair trial. You don’t have to belong to The Church of England to hold a political appointment, nor do you languish in a prison cell awaiting a trial that will never come. You definitely will not be hung for saying you dislike or disagree with your political leaders.

This concept, that regular people, fellow countrymen are our leaders, because we choose them to be, was rather unique back then. That the People, not the government, was the ultimate power. That We the People decide our fate, not Kings in a distant land, nor a Parliament which didn’t represent us directly, but told us that they did.

We The People…well, we kind of forget that from time to time. That those men who signed a letter, put everything on the line, did so, so we can decide our own fate.

A little Revolution now and then, is a good thing…

I’m sorry to inform you that the Revolution didn’t end at Yorktown. Actually, it’s still going on. One unique quality of the United States of America is that we are in a constant state of revolt. Every four years we reshape our collective vision for our nation. We go from Right to Left, from Up to Down. We find those servants willing to direct us in a way we desire. And if they don’t follow the vision they lay out? Well, we can peaceable remove them in the next election.

At the time, this government of the people, by the people, for the people. Was unique in the world. An experiment to see if people can rule themselves. That, we are, under our Constitution, created equality among ourselves. No one is above the law we set forth to govern ourselves.

It’s not perfect, we’ve made a lot of mistakes along the way. We have also owned up to many of those mistakes and strive to put them right. Our nation isn’t perfect, yet we strive to be. We strive to do our best, improve our lot in life, and the lot of others around the world. We, revolt, and we have never stopped from day one.

So, take a look at your signature. And by doing so, consider those imperfect men who wrote a letter to their King and said he was King of them no more. That they would govern themselves.

And as you look at your signature, consider what they put on the line to sign that letter. The price of failure. And ask yourself this simply question.

Would you have signed it? Knowing failure would have cost you everything? And if not, what would have become of us if they didn’t?

 

Advertisements

Cats, Kids and The Karen.

Borderwallbrownsvile

Border wall at Brownsville / Wikimedia Commons.

 

Cats

Have you ever met a cat lady? They don’t necessarily have to be a lady, just a person who has collected cats over the years to the point of obsession. What starts off as one or two, grows into a horde of twenty.

These people always start out with the best of intentions. They take in an abandon cat, a stray, and it joins their home. Yet, soon others arrive, and what was once a good deed, becomes a house overwhelmed with litter boxes and cans of empty cat food. Good intentions gone awry.

My mother was such a person. She had a good heart, and was a kind person. She judged people on how they treated cats. If you couldn’t be kind to a cat, well, you wouldn’t be kind to people. She had a good point there.

Yet, as a cat lady, that had no other desire than to make the world a better place for those furry felines, she soon lost control and was overwhelmed.

See, the problem of being a cat lady? Everyone knows it. And despite the jeers and leers, they take advantage of you. They tell their friends about you, others that have ‘just too many cats’ and give out your address. So, within a short time, it is well-known you will take in every stray that comes along.

This happened to my mother. At first it was just a few, that she could take care of, get fixed or spaded, and keep up with the litter and food. Yet when the few became a horde, the cats took on a life of their own. Pulling her and my father down financially. She just couldn’t keep up, try as she might. Even after turning new strays away, more would come, because the word hadn’t gotten out yet.

Her good intentions, tied her and my father to their home. Making their golden years a prison full of furry inmates. Traveling became problematic, guest too, even simple things like going to the store required two carts of food. One for humans, one for cats.

Kids

In a sense, the United States of America has its own cat issue. Except they are people. People who brave a long and dangerous journey just to find out that we are not taking in more strays. This isn’t the fault of those who come here. Their lives in their home countries is less than desirable. Even the countries they pass through to get to the U.S.A. are not the most friendly to their plight. And now, their destination has closed their doors.

In the media are countless stories of those who make the journey. Debates rage on social media and in the chambers of Congress. People lament over the separation of children from their parents. Calling this unjust and evil. Comparing this policy to Nazi Germany, or to Interment of the Japanese during WWII.

Neither of those comparisons are correct, nor remotely accurate. It’s just hyperbole to drive emotions and make people more engaged and enraged.

Yet to separate children from their parents for trying to find a better home? Well, if you didn’t expect backlash, you are really out of touch.

But what to do? What to do?

The Karen

You read that right, The Karen. If you have never heard of The Karen, don’t feel bad. I had never heard of them either till they became my neighbors.

The Karen are an indigenous people from Myanmar (Burma) that have been forced from their lands to now live on the border in Thailand. They live in refugee camps and eke out a living. Many have applied for and gained refugee status in other countries. Canada and the United States being popular destinations.

Now here is something interesting about the Karen. They are pretty basic people, good people who were farmers, who do their best to adjust to their new homes. English is extremely hard for them to learn, as their culture is very different from ours. Concepts like ‘Last Names’ and even how you address siblings by order. (different words for different orders of birth – Sister and Brother only work in a two kid family.)

As far as I know, The Karen are not radical in any way. They do not have extreme political views or religious beliefs that would make any American bat an eye at.

The point I am trying to make is this. There is no reason why these refugees, who have a legitimate (and well-known to our government) reason to seek asylum, should have to wait for years to become American citizens. But in a discussion with my neighbor the other day, that is exactly what he and his family are doing. For the last 7 years.

Solving the Unsolvable.

If you think the government of the United States has a solution, you would be wrong. Neither side on the political spectrum has a solution. Ideas have been tried. From outright amnesty to building a wall to stop the influx of immigrants. With every ‘solution’ there are problems.

Don’t think I am going to solve it here, I’m not.

Yet after my discussion with my neighbor, I came to the conclusion that our immigration polices are broken. And I thought about that more than I did solutions. We don’t need solutions yet, we need to ask ourselves the right questions.

1.) Who do we want to immigrate to the United States?

a.) Those who can bring with them their educational and work experience. Thus, Self-Starters.

b.) Refugees from War torn regions and Ethic cleansing. Who are in peril in their native lands.

c.) Economic refugees. Those who seek a better economic life, or flee areas of violence and instability that prevents them from making a living.

d.) Simply those who wish to be a United States citizen. To start a new life in this country.

 

2.) What do we do with those who are here illegally?

a.) We send them back. Without tying up our judicial system.

b.) We process each claim, allowing them to live where they choose.

c.) We create Detention Cites, to process those who come, and when those cities are full, forbid those new entries, from entry.

d.) We grant them amnesty. Thus resetting the books, and start fresh.

3.) What do we do with DACA and those families with so-called Anchor Babies?

a.) We would have to amend the Constitution, creating an Amendment that changes the 14th Amendment. Barring Anchor Babies citizenship directly. Yet they can apply at 18 years of age and given preference.

b.) We could arrange for those who fall under DACA and those who have a U.S. citizen as a child, to be granted permanent legal status. Alien Resident.

c.) We could allow all DACA’s to be granted U.S. citizenship immediately, if they meet a certain criteria.

d.) We could grant amnesty to all DACA’s and families of U.S. born citizens.

 

And finally…

 

We need to have a discussion in the United States. One not based on political agenda, nor based on perceived or actual racism. But one of what we want as a nation. As compassionate or uncaring as we may seem as a people, eventually, if left unchecked, we will become a Cat Lady nation. Unable to sustain ourselves, and eventually collapse under the influx of unchecked immigration. No nation on this planet can absorb the rest of the world.

Yet we can’t simply build a wall and call it done. Nor can we take families apart and think that will be a deterrent. We have to figure out the Who, What, and Where of immigration. Design polices that benefit not only our nation, but those who come here seeking a new life.

One thing I got from my Karen neighbor that was interesting. Despite having to wait in line for the last 7 years. He has the American Dream. He wants to become and American. I know this not through his words, but actions.

You see, it is my neighbors kids, his 6-year-old son, and 9-year-old daughter who have become fixtures at my home. Here to play with my children, to hone their English skills, learn about what it means to be an American, by hanging around Americans.

For whatever we decide as a nation, how we fix this issue, and set forth guidelines for the future. We must remember that those who come to our nation, become our nation. That they, seeking freedom and a sense of security, also want to be us. That the melting pot does work, and must work for all.

That what has made our nation the desired place to resettle, is that we accept all, and they become us. That our nation is the world, and that Out Of the Many, we become One.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Inexplicable.

20171216_182608 (2)

Statue of a child reading to a dog. / Photo by KidZond.

 

So now what? It happened again, as it has happened before. A person with a grudge, or madness, or maybe just disconnected with humanity, took innocent lives.

Pundits abound, and yes, even me. Yet don’t expect answers from me. I don’t have any, only questions, many questions.

The first question I have is Gun Control. Logically, and let’s be real here, logically we should have stricter gun control. National Registry, more in-depth background checks, maybe even restricting who can have guns. You can’t possess alcohol in the United States until you are 21. Smoke until you are 18. Defend your Nation until you are 18. Why should children touch weapons until then? Logical question.

But we know the answer. Whether you are “Pro-Gun” or “Anti-Gun” the ability to control some 300 Million firearms is daunting, if not impossible. From lawsuits to skirting the law by schematics, to definitions as to what exactly is a dangerous firearm. Gun Control, as noble and lofty as is sounds, is impractical for prevention of gun violence.

The 2nd Amendment needs to be repealed argument comes up. Considering that we only have 27 Amendments in our “241 years” as a nation, should tell you something about how hard that would be. Yes some Amendments have been repealed, but the 2nd Amendment? That is not going to happen.

Of course Mental Illness has entered the discussion. With many using Mental Illness as a foil to this scourge just like others, who use an inanimate object as the foil. Obviously the teen in Texas had to be mad, because sane people do not just kill people. So goes the argument. Yet many suffer from mental illness and live out productive, well-adjusted lives, never once posing a threat to others, much less themselves.

And whether those who perpetrate these crimes are mentally ill or not, labeling a whole group, or suggesting this group alone is responsible, is damning to our society. Especially to sufferers who want nothing more than to be accepted. Try telling your boss you take medicine for depression and not have them start to ‘watch you’. Bantering about mental illness as the sole cause is absurd.

Then there are those who say it is societies fault. That if we just had fathers in those children’s home, or if we didn’t have video games full of violence, they would grow up just fine. However many people grow up in broken homes. Homes filled with violence, drugs, and alcohol. Yet they do not go out and murder people.

You could say this is all due to a lack of Faith. That God has been stricken from the classroom and demeaned to the point of being called a fairytale, and this is the root cause. However it was religious zealots who took down the Twin Towers in New York City. Jim Jones, David Koresh, and dozens of examples exist to say that Religion doesn’t prevent mass killings. Of course Stalin wasn’t a very religious guy and he murdered millions. Individual shooters in recent events have not professed great faith or lack there of.

 

Daniele_Crespi_-_Cain_Killing_Abel_-_WGA5743

Daniele Crespi – Cain Killing Abel/Wiki Commons.

 

One possibility to this issue can be found in an old archetype story from the Bible. The story of Cain and Able. The ‘First Murder’.

In the story Cain’s offerings to God are rejected. His brother Able’s are accepted. This implied jealousy finally drives Cain to murder his brother Able.

So the story goes.

However the story has other meanings that are missed. At one point, God warns Cain that Evil is ‘knocking at the door’ (paraphrasing the passage). God tells Cain to be wary of his feelings and attitude. Cain, ignores this and slays his brother.

And while there are many other metaphors that can be taken from this story, this warning from God stands out to me.

See, when it comes down to it, it is the individuals decision that casts the die. They are the ones that plan out their heinous acts. They are the only one who readies themselves. Who, if so inclined, has to confront what evil they plan to do. And if they have self-doubt, or find their humanity, and sanity to turn away from their deed, change their own mind and stop themselves.

No matter what we do as a society, what laws we pass, amendments we repeal, court ordered mental evaluations, those who wish to do harm to others, they, and only they, can stop themselves.

This doesn’t negate our responsibility as members of society. We should be vigilant to stop those who wander the path of Cain. We should exam all avenues that can prevent these terrible crimes, to protect the innocent, and make us safer.

No one political or ideological solution will solve this. Blaming others to make sense of these tragic events does not one damn bit of good. Finding solutions to stop future tragedies is not based on Gun Control, 2nd Amendment Rights, School Security, Mental Health, or Legal solutions. It is based on all of these combined, working in concert, to solve a greater issue. Stopping the inexplicable, less we find ourselves wandering in the land of Nod forever.

 

[Opinions expressed in this Blog are the Authors and the Authors alone.]
https://www.npr.org/2016/01/05/462017461/guns-in-america-by-the-numbers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cain_and_Abel

 

The Lefthanded side of White Privilage.

20180126_192437820975223.jpg

A Heart pierced by an Arrow. / Illustration by an Evil Left-hander. [KidZond]

I think it was the post that set me off. Yes, I had heard the term ‘White Privilege’ for quite some time. It had been bantered about on the News, Talk Radio, Social Media and from a few friends mouths. I read this story where two men who check different boxes on official forms have a discussion and the guy who checks ‘White/ Non-Hispanic’ makes his point and… golly gee, all is well. White Privilege is vanquished.

I have to admit I bought into that. I check the same box, ‘White/Non-Hispanic’ and well yeah, I don’t feel privileged. It was rather simple for me to believe this. I am not privileged.

See, like many people who check the same box as I do on official forms, I live a pretty basic life. I work hard, pay bills, struggle with bills, have the same issues as any average American. How was my being white giving me privilege? I certainly didn’t feel privileged.

It angered me because those I heard from, read about, posted stories and comment on the subject of white privilege, kept talking about how I was racist because of the color of my skin.

And that was the element to the narrative the irritated me. That White Privilege equaled racism.

It was when I read a post from a friend who invoked those very sentiments that I wanted to know more about White Privilege. Why had so many equate it with racism? How was the color of ones skin a determination factor on who they were as an individual?

For those who check another box, other than I do…sound familiar?

Then I made a startling discovery. White Privilege, as many use the term, is a misnomer. It doesn’t refer to racism, it refers to Left-handedness.

20180126_2247102032188823.jpg

Right-handed Scissors./Photo by KidZond.

Are you Right-handed or Left-handed? Most likely you are right-handed, most of humanity is. But not all. I was born left-handed, but switched over to use my right hand. Fairly common back in the 60’s. My eldest daughter is left-handed, and one day she found something that upset her. A little jocular note my wife (Who is also left-handed) had on our fridge. It simply stated this:

“Left-handed people are more likely to die in accidents than right-handed people.”

She asked me if that was true. I told her I doubted that, and for the record, it is not true. But, I did say there was some kernel of truth to the matter. She of course, asked how? And I explained.

They world is built for Right-handed people. Everything you use, pick up, open, close, write on, is built for those who use their right hand. I told her she would always have that obstacle to deal with. She will need to either deal with easy to get right-handed scissors, or buy a pair of left-handed scissors at some out-of-the-way store. Little things for sure, but annoying things.

My daughter, a left-hander, lived in a right-hand world. And there was nothing she could do about it.

Consider the common phrases you hear everyday. Right hand man, raise your right hand, right hand of God. Then there are more simple things. Ever open a door by grabbing the knob on the left? No? When you shake someones hand which hand do you use? And that is exactly what White Privilege is.

Now was this done by design? Yes.

It was done because those who created the system, well, they were all ‘Right-Handers’. Despite the common narrative to keep others down, no, not really. They were simply never factored into the equation. Those ‘Left-Handers’ just didn’t matter enough to even bother about. So all those ‘right-handers’ who check that box, well, the world is built for them.

It may seem minor to some. It may seem that we have reached equality. We think so, we believe this to be true. Yet try living in a left-hand world when you use your right-hand. Wouldn’t be so easy would it? Little reminders everyday that you are different. That the world is not made for you, but revolves around those ‘right-handers’.

I do not have a solution. I’ll leave that to smarter minds. Yet I hope this little comparison takes the debate away from strictly racial ideologies. White Privilege is not about racism. It’s about being left-handed in a right-handed world…and having to use those damn scissors for a living, without the option to buy a pair that fit your hand.

 

Millennials and their love of Net Neutrality.

480px-Commodore_2001_Series-IMG_0448b

Photo by Rama. Wikipedia Commons.

 

Have to admit it, getting older has its perks. The biggest perk is what my father used to say to me all the time when I did something stupid.

“I’m not smarter than you, I’ve just lived longer and experienced more.”

Which, to my chagrin, was true. Enter a point I was trying to make to a group of Millennials this week on Facebook. The subject? Net Neutrality. To this up and coming generation, it is the end of the world. Big corporations are now going to ruin the internet with fees for every click.

(I probably will owe Google/ Comcast/ and Joe’s ISP Services a few hundred by the end of this post.)

While I could argue the pros and cons of Net Neutrality in this blog post, I would rather concentrate on the Millennials reactions, here are the highlights:

I was called stupid.

I was called a Rich Repugnant (I assume Republican)

I was called ‘tinfoil hat wearing Nostradamus’ (My personal favorite)

And incoherent.

I will give them credit at insults and tear downs. By far, they are superior to my abilities. Which was sort of my point in the back and forth. I was in their territory.

Consider the stylish computer at the top of this article. I learned about computers on one of these in my Senior year of High School…back in 1982. It ran on DOS, and only DOS. My smartphone can do more than that old personal computer. Yet at the time? It was cutting edge.

As a Baby Boomer I grew up with 3 network channels, newspapers and the radio. Research meant going to the library. A lot of time and effort had to be put into knowledge. In my childhood, and even into my twenties, the world was a very small place. You learned patience, not because you wanted to be patient, but you had to be.

Want those pictures of a night out with friends? Take them to a little booth in the parking lot of the nearest K-Mart and drop off your film. Come back in a couple of days and pick up your prints. Oh, you are going to have to drive over to your friend’s place to show them. Mail a print if they were visiting from out-of-town. Hopefully your finger wasn’t on the lens, retakes and do overs didn’t happen back then. The inventors of Instagram weren’t even born yet.

So, am I another older generation whining about the softer younger generation?

No. I am not.

I love this day and age. This to me? Is just flipping awesome. You have no idea, unless you are of my age or older. Even Generation Xers can’t really relate. They had Cable and Atari games. For me, and many of my Baby Boomer friends and relatives, this is an amazing time to be alive. It is the capability to have knowledge at the tip of my fingers that still gets me. I so dearly wish I grew up with this technology.

However, if I did, would I have as deep of an appreciation for it as I do now? Doubtful. I never appreciated indoor plumbing. Never thought much about the automobiles my parents had when I grew up. Color Television was cool when we got ours. Yet we always had a television in my house (B&W T.V.’s were very common up until the 80’s). My parents, even with T.V.’s, still listen to the radio often.

There are many things I grew up with that I took for granted. My parents thought they were marvels. My grandparents were even more in awe by modern inventions. Then again, they thought my parents were soft. Guess when you remember when automobiles first came out, and you didn’t have to hitch up the horses to the wagon to go to town, those who grew up with automobiles would be ‘soft’.

Millennials, and I have two of them myself, grew up with immediacy. The world was at their fingertips almost at their beginnings. Oh, they remember flip phones, and when smartphones came out. Most, however, can’t ever remember not being around computers. If not at home, certainly in school. This is a generation that has grown up with the internet, everything that has the utmost meaning to them came from the internet. They connect with friends via the internet, they find love through it, they find causes to believe in. It has, by default, become their Sacred Sanctuary.

My little ‘argument’ on the Facebook post was a little experiment into the psychology of Millennials. While I am not a professional in mental health, I am a curious person. I purposely found ways to politely antagonize those Millennials into defending Net Neutrality. While I made some good points, I have a confession.

I really don’t know squat about Net Neutrality. Just a tidbit here and there. And honestly? I am not that concerned. I do not believe my internet bill is going to skyrocket. Nor do I believe innovation will be crushed by corporate giants. Sorry Millennials, I have been around too long. I’ve seen this before, and I can promise you, you will see it again.

What I do believe is that Millennials see Net Neutrality as more than a cause du jour. This is tantamount to Tipper Gore’s desire to ban Heavy Metal, or banning the Beatles Music from radio play. The internet is their “Everything” and those who dare to curb it, charge for it, or defy it, they…well they will face the wrath of a Generation.

Across the Thin Blue Line.

received_10215328747710062.jpg

A home with Blue Lights Photo by Jenelle Kendrick

By Js Kendrick

 

 

I have noticed something different about my city this week. Many of the standard white porch lights have been replaced by blue porch lights.

I first noticed this on my drive home from work at night, one here, one there. At first I wasn’t exactly sure of the reason. I knew that a tragic event had happened involving a Police Officer, yet I knew nothing of the blue lights.

As far as I can find out, the concept of the blue porch light to honor fallen officers began in 1989. It was started by Mrs. Dolly Craig who had lost her son-in-law in the line of duty on June 5, 1986 and her daughter in a car accident in August of 1989. The couple had left behind six children that were now without parents. Mrs. Craig wrote to the organization Concerns of Police Survivors that she was going to put two blue candles in her window that holiday season to honor both her son-in-law and daughter.

The idea caught on and candles were replaced by blue porch lights.

Then in 2014 a Virginia man, Daniel Jessup, came up with the idea to create a Blue Light Week, beginning January 1st 2015 till January 7th. It became an idea to show support for Law Enforcement, which at that time period, had been experiencing negative media coverage for incidents involving police shootings.

When the Major of my city, Tom McNamara, had the lights over a bridge changed to blue. It started the movement in my city. Soon people were buying blue lights left and right. So much so that stores ran out of stock. He wanted to show respect for the fallen officer, asking people to put up blue lights, and ordered the flags in our city flown at half mast.

The sad reason for all this happened on November 5th, 2017 at 1 a.m. in the morning during a routine traffic stop.

Two men, who most likely had never met before, were to meet. And before too long both men would be dead. Leaving family and friends, and a city, grieving and wondering what had transpired to cause this tragedy.

Officer Jamie Cox, just 30 years old, a Veteran of the U.S. Army National Guard and who had previously worked for the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, had joined the Rockford Police Department in 2016. He had been on the job as a police officer for just 11 months.

He had pulled over 49-year-old Eddie Patterson, a father and grandfather, a man who had for the last 14 years worked at a local event center in my city. He was driving a pick up truck with plates that didn’t match the truck.

What we do know at this time is very little. For reasons unknown Mr. Patterson decided to drive off. Officer Cox became entangled in Patterson’s truck and discharged his side arm killing Mr. Patterson whose truck crashed two blocks away from the original stop. Officer Cox was mortally wounded by the impact. He was able to call for assistance and was transported to a local hospital where he died a short time later.

There wasn’t a dash camera in the squad car, nor was Officer Cox wearing a body camera. As of this writing, no eye witnesses have come forward to give the police additional information. A Task Force has been assigned to determine exactly what transpired that night.

As the news and information came trickling out, many took to social media to ask how this could happen. Why did Mr. Patterson drive off? How did Officer Cox become entangled in Patterson’s truck? What caused this tragic event?

Unfortunately an added component to this tragedy is the factor of Race. Officer Cox was White. Mr. Patterson was Black. In an era of exacerbated racial tensions, this component wasn’t lost to those on social media. That Officer Cox shot Mr. Patterson, who to our knowledge was unarmed, and that Mr. Patterson drove off with Officer Cox attached, has the community asking questions. It also has the community taking sides.

Those on both sides of the argument who are rushing to judgement to lay blame are doing a grave disservice to the memories of both Officer Cox and Mr. Patterson. The only people who truly know what happened that night are them. And sadly, neither one can tell us their story.

There is a Task Force that is investigating this incident. Yet others are asking for the Federal Government to investigate this incident. Concerns that the Police department would not be forthcoming. Another sign of our times, trust is a rare commodity these days.

Personally, I feel the story will end with the simplest of reasons. Human error, on both sides. For some reason Mr. Patterson panicked, and Officer Cox tried to stop him from driving off. Sadly, this human element of our nature, will most likely be the root cause of this tragedy. Yet, this is just my opinion, and all the facts are not known yet. And everyone should do the oddest of things, we should wait. Be patient.

In this day and age of instant information, being patient has become a problem with our society. We rarely have to wait for anything anymore. The world is at our fingertips, and news cycles usually exceed the facts. Facts take time, they take patience. People have become unaccustomed to waiting for information. They want it now. Yet this is not reality. Investigations, especially of this sort, take time. Rushing to judgement only polarize communities and creates an air of distrust and cover-up. None of which seems to be the case in this incident. The police are taking time, keeping silent, and going over the facts in a painstaking way. Social Media doesn’t really care for that. They want to know, and know now.

 

received_10215328741469906.jpg

Photo by Jenelle Kendrick

 

Till we know the full story, let the investigations play out, blue lights will adorn the porches of my city, Rockford Illinois, for the month of November. To honor the fallen Officer. Yet in a larger sense, it should stand as a reminder that two men lost their lives that night. That try as we might to be perfect, and not to make mistakes, we are only human. And that waiting, is truly the hardest part of this process.

 

 

 

Sources: http://www.nationalcops.org / http://www.sun-gazing.com / http://www.rrstar.com/news/20171106/